Bocombe Mill Cottage logo

An organic garden with
a long circular walk in North West Devon

Bocombe Mill Cottage, Bocombe,
Near Clovelly, Devon
EX39 5PH

Phone:
01237 451293

Owners:
Chris Butler & David Burrows

Welcome Location Opening times The gardens Circular walk
Photo diary Garden history Local places of interest Blog flower Press
Photo diary 2019
What can possibly follow on from 2018’s Photo Diary of Exotic Flowers? This year we’ve a wide variety of plant structures that contain seeds. All grown at Bocombe.
May 2019
May 2019
The familiar seed head of a poppy. This group of poppies were grown from seed at Bocombe; with the ripening seed head are tight flower buds and a fully open flower.
April 2019
April 2019
A spectacular foliage plant that we always grow in our conservatories, Sauromatum venosum. Supposedly tender, one escaped into our Kitchen Garden some years ago and now grows there quite happily without any winter protection. Another of the “voodoo lily” group, this plant produces a foul-smelling spathe, followed by a single rounded leaf with many lance shaped segments. The bright fruits follow on as the plant retreats back into the soil for another year.
March 2019
March 2019
A further pine cone, this time with a two-year-old tree grown from this very cone here at Bocombe. Pine cones were collected in Cornwall. It’s the iconic Shelter Belt pine of Cornwall and Devon. A Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata). You can buy a two year old specimen when we open our garden for the NGS this year, all in aid of the NGS supported charities.
February 2019
February 2019
Now around 15 years old, our Stone Pine (Pinus pinea) has produced cones for the last couple of years. They’re famous, of course, as they produce Pine Nuts, that expensive Mediterranean ingredient. Situated on the sunniest and driest position we have, the tree is growing well and now producing copious fir cones.
January 2019
January 2019
From a peculiar source, this mis-named seed produced a very tall, evergreen, white Abutilon. A rare and unusual plant. And its own seed is contained in this typical, flat headed structure.
Photo diary 2018
“Exotic flowers grown at Bocombe” was the theme for our 2018 Photo Diary. Feast your eyes on our exotic blooms – and the rest of the landscape - when we open our Garden during May this year. Or stretch the seasons by bringing your group of ten or more from the start of March, with thousands of bulbs, to the end of July, with summer flowering shrubs and perennials!
December 2018
December 2018
A perennial climber from Chile grows (and flowers) almost all year round in the mild climate of South West England. We’ve encouraged the red flowering plants as oppose to the orange flowers that we think lack impact. Both seed readily. Known as the Chilean Glory Vine, or Chilean Vine, or Glory Vine. Eccremocarpus scaber.
November 2018
November 2018
In the grounds of the Bibi Ka Maqbara mausoleum at Aurangabad, India we enjoyed many garden features, including exotic tiled and sculptured pools. Here’s one of the many repeated flower motifs – a depiction of the lotus flower, Nelumbo nucifera.
October 2018
October 2018
Probably better known for its vegetative propagation techniques than its flowers, this succulent readily produces plantlets (epiphyllous buds) that root astonishingly easily, but with the right conditions will also flower. Bryophllum tuberosum.
September 2018
September 2018
Scrambling through a hedge or two is this delightful blue flower from China. The typical hood of Monks Hood, but a climber. Aconitum hemsleyanum.
August 2018
August 2018
A plant from the South Eastern American swamps with an array of exotic blooms. Next to the flower stalks you can just spot the pitchers that give this plant its common name, a Pitcher Plant, growing happily in our Frog Pool. Sarracenia flava.
July 2018
July 2018
Here’s a flower not often found in gardens. Firstly, it’s a vegetable. Secondly, if you want to harvest the root then don’t let this biennial flower! But a stunning addition to any border. Visitors to our garden are stumped by it. Salsify (Tragopogon porrifoliu).
June 2018
June 2018
This month’s flower looks like something from the "Little Shop of Horrors". First there’s the stupendous stench from the magnificent spathe. Latter, wonderfully divided foliage and a mottled stem. There are many, many "Voodoo Lilies" belonging to the Arum family! Most are not widely grown and are poorly recorded. Could this be Amorphophallus stipitatus or A. konjac?
May 2018
May 2018
We’ve grown this water meadow plant at Bocombe for well over a decade. It is rather particular about where it lives, and after numerous attempts at planting the bulbs we’ve at last established a few thriving colonies, mainly by seeding themselves to ground they like. The Snakes Head Fritillary, Fritillaria meleagris.
April 2018
April 2018
Many years ago we discovered this exotic conservatory plant from South Africa on a fruit and veg stall at Barnstaple’s Pannier Market. It’s easy to grow in well drained compost, and it produces many exotic flowering stems year after year. Keep it on the top shelf of the greenhouse once it dies back in the late spring. Leave the bulbs completely dry. When the very first green shoots appear just before Xmas feed and water well. The Cape Cowslip, Lachenalia tricolour.
March 2018
March 2018
A plain flower as modern Camellias go. But very early, in fact, with a very mild winter this year these white blooms began appearing during January. At their best in March when the temperature rises a little and frosts at Bocombe have abated. The exotic part is the en masse 10m long hedge all in flower together. Camellia japonica alba simplex.
February 2018
February 2018
Some years ago we enjoyed "A Day in China" – a garden visit and, after lunch, an illustrated talk. The garden, large and rambling with few formal paths, contained lots of interesting plants. At one point the owner took us aside to show us one of his more precious, rare specimens. On a damp, shady hillside were a few struggling plants, from China, of course. His pride and joy. 'Oh!' we said, 'it grows like fury at Bocombe Mill Cottage.' Chrysosplenium macrophyllum.
January 2018
January 2018
Growing flat on the ground, these saucer size, groups of flowers appear on bare earth in the middle of winter. We’ve a large area where they thrive in the moist, almost wet, ground at the edge of our main stream. In the spring massive leaves a metre across on long stalks a metre high appear. Petasites japonicus giganteus.

Location Opening times The gardens Circular walk
Photo diary Garden history Local places of interest Blog flower Press